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This article describes the history of Abraham Lincoln's Iconic top hat.

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, was known for his iconic top hat. Lincoln was often seen wearing the tall, black hat, which became a symbol of his presidency and is now considered an important piece of American history.

A Hat Made of Beaver Fur?

The top hat that Lincoln wore was made of beaver fur and was a popular style of hat in the 19th century. It was known as a "stovepipe" hat because of its tall, cylindrical shape. Lincoln's top hat was made by a hat maker named Henry Lamm, who was based in Springfield, Illinois, where Lincoln lived before he became president.

Practical Uses

Lincoln's top hat was not just a fashion statement, it was also a practical accessory. The tall shape of the hat helped Lincoln stand out in a crowd, making him easy to spot at public events. Additionally, the wide brim provided protection from the sun and rain.

An Iconic Artifact

Lincoln's top hat became a symbol of his presidency, and it was often depicted in political cartoons and illustrations. The hat was also present at many important moments in Lincoln's presidency, including his inauguration and the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. After Lincoln's assassination in 1865, the top hat was passed down through his family and was eventually donated to the Smithsonian Institution, where it remains on display to this day. The top hat has become a symbol of the presidency, and a reminder of the legacy of one of America's greatest leaders.

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