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Effect of the French and Indian War

 

This page describes the effects of the French and Indian War.

 

Home >> United States History >> French and Indian War >> Effects

 

French and Indian War

 
Causes
Effects
Summary
French and Indian War Interactive
Ohio River and Ohio River Valley
 
 

Battles

 
Fort Necessity
Fort Duquesne
Fort Niagara
Fort Beausejour
Fort Frontenac
Lake George
Ticonderoga
Thousand Islands
Louisbourg
Montreal
Quebec (Plains of Abraham)
 

Important People

 
George Washington
William Pitt
Jeffrey Amherst
 
French and Indian War Activities
 

French and Indian War – Public Domain

As a result of the British victory in the French and Indian War, France was effectively expelled from the New World. They relinquished virtually all of their New World possessions including all of Canada. They did manage to retain a few small islands off the coast of Canada and in the Caribbean. They also agreed to stay out of India, which made Great Britain the supreme military power in that part of Asia. In addition, as compensation for Spain’s loss of Florida to England, Spain was awarded the Louisiana Territory. The entire face of North America had been dramatically changed.

Following the war, England issued the Proclamation of 1763. Westward-bound settlers, however, ignored the proclamation and moved into Indian lands.

Because the English had incurred significant debt while fighting the war in and for the colonies, Parliament attempted to recoup the financial loss by issuing the 1765 Stamp Act on the colonists. The Stamp Act was a tax on virtually all printed documents. The tax was ill-received by the colonists, who began a boycott of British goods and even attacked British tax collectors. Parliament repealed the Stamp Act and instead issued the Declaratory Act, which maintained Britain’s right to tax the colonists. These tax issues would become the cause of an even greater conflict 10 years later – The American Revolution.