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War of 1812: Battle of Thames

 

Home >> United States History >> War of 1812

 

War of 1812

 
Causes/Effects
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Battles/Events

 
Battle of Tippecanoe
Fort Meigs
York
Fort Mackinac
Chippewa
Thames
Fort Detroit
Fort Dearborn
Lake Erie
Lacolle Mills
Crysler’s Farm
Plattsburgh
Queenston’s Heights
Lundy’s Lane
Frenchtown
Baltimore/Ft. McHenry
Washington
Bladensburg
Creek War/Horseshoe Bend
New Orleans
 

Important People

 
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
Dolley Madison
Andrew Jackson
Tecumseh
Oliver Hazard Perry
William Henry Harrison
Francis Scott Key
 

Major American Wars

 
French and Indian War
Revolutionary War
War of 1812
Mexican-American War
Civil War

Death of Tecumseh at the Battle of Thames

Battle of Thames – October 5, 1813

The Battle of Thames, sometimes called the Battle of Moraviatown, was a decisive American victory in the War of 1812.

After being defeated at the Battle of Lake Erie, British General Henry Proctor, deprived of supplies, retreated north. American General, and future president, William Henry Harrison, followed him into upper Canada, where the two armies met along the Thames River.

Harrison’s army of about 3,500 greatly outnumbered Proctor’s combined British and Native force of about 1,300. The British planned to trap the Americans along thebanks of the Thames River with cannon fire. The cannons, however, failed to shoot, enabling the Americans to attack the British front lines. British forces were forced to retreat through the region’s thick swamps causing many to surrender. During the retreat, the great Native chief Tecumseh was killed, demoralizing the British even more and resulting in the end of Native resistance. Following the Battle of Thames, the Americans had regained control of the Northwest Territory.